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12 Surprising Soda Flavors

12 Surprising Soda Flavors


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From strawberry milk to chai, some of the world's most unique soda flavors

Maryse Chevriere

12 Surprising Soda Flavors

Mushroom-flavored soda? Just like Jack in the Box’s new bacon shake, it’s for real, as bizarre as it sounds. Except, of course, this soda is not a fast-food company’s bait for consumer attention, but rather one of the many artisanal drinks on the menu at San Francisco’s new ice cream and soda shop, The Ice Cream Bar.

According to a story on NBC Bay Area’s Food and Drink blog, the retro soda fountain’s creative menu offers "the option to customize from a list of 13 syrups (including chicory coffee, chocolate, and pistachio), 24 house-made extracts (such as dill weed, nutmeg, and rosemary), and the daily selections from more than 75 tinctures, also crafted in-house." The mushroom soda, dubbed Touch of Grey, is made with cream, acid phosphate (which adds tartness), and candy cap mushroom syrup. Apparently, it was surprisingly good.

Sure, you expect to find such unique, off-the-wall creations at this kind of house-made soda program. But really, there are plenty of surprising and unusually flavored sodas being produced around the world. Check out our list of 12 of the most unique.


A generation of Minnesotans can remember the first time they realized some people in the world refer to “pop” as “soda.”

These were the years (say the mid-’70s) we ran to The Pop Shoppe to refill two-liter bottles with lime rickey. But the times they are, um, a-changing?

When we speak of the new fizzy drinks, we speak of craft soda. Once we got the hankering to make our own local beers and spirits, we turned next to the sweet stuff. In fact, since breweries can sell only beverages that they make themselves, many craft sodas debuted as the N/A options in local taprooms.

So let’s embrace the new fresh flavors in surprising combinations and sassy bottles and cans with graphics that, well, pop.

Photograph by Caitlin Abrams


A generation of Minnesotans can remember the first time they realized some people in the world refer to “pop” as “soda.”

These were the years (say the mid-’70s) we ran to The Pop Shoppe to refill two-liter bottles with lime rickey. But the times they are, um, a-changing?

When we speak of the new fizzy drinks, we speak of craft soda. Once we got the hankering to make our own local beers and spirits, we turned next to the sweet stuff. In fact, since breweries can sell only beverages that they make themselves, many craft sodas debuted as the N/A options in local taprooms.

So let’s embrace the new fresh flavors in surprising combinations and sassy bottles and cans with graphics that, well, pop.

Photograph by Caitlin Abrams


A generation of Minnesotans can remember the first time they realized some people in the world refer to “pop” as “soda.”

These were the years (say the mid-’70s) we ran to The Pop Shoppe to refill two-liter bottles with lime rickey. But the times they are, um, a-changing?

When we speak of the new fizzy drinks, we speak of craft soda. Once we got the hankering to make our own local beers and spirits, we turned next to the sweet stuff. In fact, since breweries can sell only beverages that they make themselves, many craft sodas debuted as the N/A options in local taprooms.

So let’s embrace the new fresh flavors in surprising combinations and sassy bottles and cans with graphics that, well, pop.

Photograph by Caitlin Abrams


A generation of Minnesotans can remember the first time they realized some people in the world refer to “pop” as “soda.”

These were the years (say the mid-’70s) we ran to The Pop Shoppe to refill two-liter bottles with lime rickey. But the times they are, um, a-changing?

When we speak of the new fizzy drinks, we speak of craft soda. Once we got the hankering to make our own local beers and spirits, we turned next to the sweet stuff. In fact, since breweries can sell only beverages that they make themselves, many craft sodas debuted as the N/A options in local taprooms.

So let’s embrace the new fresh flavors in surprising combinations and sassy bottles and cans with graphics that, well, pop.

Photograph by Caitlin Abrams


A generation of Minnesotans can remember the first time they realized some people in the world refer to “pop” as “soda.”

These were the years (say the mid-’70s) we ran to The Pop Shoppe to refill two-liter bottles with lime rickey. But the times they are, um, a-changing?

When we speak of the new fizzy drinks, we speak of craft soda. Once we got the hankering to make our own local beers and spirits, we turned next to the sweet stuff. In fact, since breweries can sell only beverages that they make themselves, many craft sodas debuted as the N/A options in local taprooms.

So let’s embrace the new fresh flavors in surprising combinations and sassy bottles and cans with graphics that, well, pop.

Photograph by Caitlin Abrams


A generation of Minnesotans can remember the first time they realized some people in the world refer to “pop” as “soda.”

These were the years (say the mid-’70s) we ran to The Pop Shoppe to refill two-liter bottles with lime rickey. But the times they are, um, a-changing?

When we speak of the new fizzy drinks, we speak of craft soda. Once we got the hankering to make our own local beers and spirits, we turned next to the sweet stuff. In fact, since breweries can sell only beverages that they make themselves, many craft sodas debuted as the N/A options in local taprooms.

So let’s embrace the new fresh flavors in surprising combinations and sassy bottles and cans with graphics that, well, pop.

Photograph by Caitlin Abrams


A generation of Minnesotans can remember the first time they realized some people in the world refer to “pop” as “soda.”

These were the years (say the mid-’70s) we ran to The Pop Shoppe to refill two-liter bottles with lime rickey. But the times they are, um, a-changing?

When we speak of the new fizzy drinks, we speak of craft soda. Once we got the hankering to make our own local beers and spirits, we turned next to the sweet stuff. In fact, since breweries can sell only beverages that they make themselves, many craft sodas debuted as the N/A options in local taprooms.

So let’s embrace the new fresh flavors in surprising combinations and sassy bottles and cans with graphics that, well, pop.

Photograph by Caitlin Abrams


A generation of Minnesotans can remember the first time they realized some people in the world refer to “pop” as “soda.”

These were the years (say the mid-’70s) we ran to The Pop Shoppe to refill two-liter bottles with lime rickey. But the times they are, um, a-changing?

When we speak of the new fizzy drinks, we speak of craft soda. Once we got the hankering to make our own local beers and spirits, we turned next to the sweet stuff. In fact, since breweries can sell only beverages that they make themselves, many craft sodas debuted as the N/A options in local taprooms.

So let’s embrace the new fresh flavors in surprising combinations and sassy bottles and cans with graphics that, well, pop.

Photograph by Caitlin Abrams


A generation of Minnesotans can remember the first time they realized some people in the world refer to “pop” as “soda.”

These were the years (say the mid-’70s) we ran to The Pop Shoppe to refill two-liter bottles with lime rickey. But the times they are, um, a-changing?

When we speak of the new fizzy drinks, we speak of craft soda. Once we got the hankering to make our own local beers and spirits, we turned next to the sweet stuff. In fact, since breweries can sell only beverages that they make themselves, many craft sodas debuted as the N/A options in local taprooms.

So let’s embrace the new fresh flavors in surprising combinations and sassy bottles and cans with graphics that, well, pop.

Photograph by Caitlin Abrams


A generation of Minnesotans can remember the first time they realized some people in the world refer to “pop” as “soda.”

These were the years (say the mid-’70s) we ran to The Pop Shoppe to refill two-liter bottles with lime rickey. But the times they are, um, a-changing?

When we speak of the new fizzy drinks, we speak of craft soda. Once we got the hankering to make our own local beers and spirits, we turned next to the sweet stuff. In fact, since breweries can sell only beverages that they make themselves, many craft sodas debuted as the N/A options in local taprooms.

So let’s embrace the new fresh flavors in surprising combinations and sassy bottles and cans with graphics that, well, pop.

Photograph by Caitlin Abrams


Watch the video: ΕΚΑΝΑ ΤΟ ΕΜΒΟΛΙΟ. Manuella (January 2023).